Ever wanted to create your own super-duper adventure game in the vein of those old Sierra and Lucasarts classics? If you’re open to flexing your point-n-click muscles with the big boys, then perhaps it’s time to try out Adventure Game Studio. All the cool kids use it, and so can you.

Adventure Game Studio (or AGS, as it is more conveniently known) is a specialised game development framework used to make all sorts of classic adventure scenarios, equipped with ready-made functionality for pathfinding, inventory management, and the ability to save games so that developers can focus on the juicy stuff: making interesting puzzles, characters and environments for the player.

 

Shifter's Box, a short adventure game made in AGS and inspired by a really twisted imagination."

Shifter's Box, a short adventure game made in AGS and inspired by a really twisted imagination."

AGS makes use of a friendly, Windows-based interface that eases you into the game creation process and allows any user to create simple applications once the basics have been learned. For more advanced users, the program also comes equipped with its own scripting tool, allowing you to code more complicated interactions, events and other programming magic.

AGS sports a very large community, all of who are enthusiastically churning out whole packs of cool adventure games. Before you decide whether or not AGS is the tool for you, just have a look at the sort of results that it offers. Some examples are of extremely high quality, such as A Tale of Two Kingdoms: a full-length, commercial-quality fantasy adventure with a deep story and a well-crafted set of puzzles for players to solve.

 

Trilby: The Art of Theft. Like every other Thief clone out there, except that it doesn't suck.

Trilby: The Art of Theft. Like every other Thief clone out there, except that it doesn't suck.

Then there’s Yahtzee. Yes, that’s Mr “I hate every videogame in existence” Yahtzee. The famous Zero Punctuation creator doesn’t just review games – he makes them too, and has been doing so for a mighty long time. His weapon of choice: AGS. In fact, he loved AGS so much that he went on to create one of the best indie games of 2007 with it. Oh, and it was an action platformer, made that way just because he wanted to prove a point about the engine’s flexibility.

If you want to get started on AGS yourself, a brilliant way to get familiar with it would be to follow these handy tutorials. If you’re still having problems (or just want to get involved with the community), have a look at the AGS forums. The local Game.Dev community also has a few members who wield the stick of AGS experience, so stop on by and show off your new project if you have something up your sleeve.

More stuff like this: