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Ubisoft’s latest addition to the Tom Clancy franchise, The Division, is shaping up to be a huge step up for PC gaming in general. It’s launching on an advanced engine that was built from scratch several times over, it places players into a drop-in-drop-out multiplayer instance, allows you to do some truly treacherous things to your teammates, and is the only known game to include an achievement for closing a car door. Along with the changes it makes for the FPS and third-person shooter genres, which I hope stick because I love multiplayer games with emergent storylines, The Division will also be a bit of dog for older PCs, with minimum system requirements that require a quad-core CPU just to launch the game.

The system requirements weren’t officially announced by Ubisoft at first, but were instead leaked in the game files of the PC beta. Aside from the system requirements, other interesting things popped out from there as well, like native support for multi-monitor setups, a supported 21:9 aspect ratio option, DRM by Denuvo, and the ability to turn off every HUD item in the game, making the experience a bit more like Metro 2033‘s Ranger mode (and hopefully we won’t have to pay for it either).

Anyway, take a quick look at the requirements:

Minimum recommended system requirements

  • OS: Windows 7, 8.1, 10 64-bit
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2400, or AMD FX-6100
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560, or AMD Radeon HD 7770 (2GB VRAM required)
  • RAM: 6GB
  • HDD: 40GB free space
  • Internet: Broadband connection with 256 kbps upstream, Uplay account required

Recommended system requirements

  • OS: Windows 7, 8.1, 10 64-bit
  • CPU: Intel Core i7-3770, or AMD FX-8360 or better
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970, or AMD Radeon R9 290 or better
  • RAM: 8GB
  • HDD: 40GB free space
  • Internet: Broadband connection with 512 kbps upstream, Uplay account required

It’s another game to add to the growing list of titles that will only launch with a quad-core CPU installed. The Division takes place in a world that is largely persistent so long as you stay in the same server instance, though some areas in the game will get reset from time to time like the “Dark Zones”, basically dedicated areas for PvP combat, that are dotted around the map. The environments are destructable, but this is achieved through use of NVIDIA’s Physx API, so there will be somewhat less detail when running things off the CPU.

The 2GB VRAM requirement is an interesting one, as is the 6GB system RAM requirement. Either these are buffers so that Ubisoft’s developers don’t have to deal with complaints from people running it on systems with less memory, or there’s an actual bottom line of how much memory is required to run the game on its own. Far Cry 4 at 1080p with medium settings consumes just over 2.4GB of VRAM, so running the game at 720p  should drop that to around 1.2GB or less. It’s also worth noting that The Division isn’t a DirectX 12 game, so you won’t need to upgrade your operating system to run it. It might have some DX12-only features that will pop up later, and Ubisoft will probably fill us in on those when the game’s launch is just around the corner.

For those of you who don’t have the minimum recommended specs, here’s what I expect will be required to run the game at medium settings at 720p with an average framerate hovering around 50fps.

  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600, or AMD Athlon X4 620 or better
  • GPU: NVIDIA Geforce GT 730, or AMD Radeon R7 240 with 1GB GDDR5
  • RAM: 4GB DDR3-1333 (10.6GB/s transfer speed)
  • HDD: 30GB free space

As for notebooks, anything with an Intel Core i5 mobile CPU from Ivy Bridge onwards, with a Geforce GT 750M with 2GB of DDR3 should be playable at 720p and medium settings, with framerates averaging around 30fps. That’s gleaned from looking at the Far Cry 4 results for the GT 750 on Notebookcheck, but I don’t think I’ll be too far off.

Tom Clancy’s The Division launches on 8 March 2016 for the Windows PC, Microsoft Xbox One and Sony Playstation 4. You can pre-order the game through BT Games, CNA, Takealot, Raru, or AWX. It’s also available through Steam, Greenman Gaming, the Humble Store (eventually), Sony PSN, Xbox Live, and of course Ubisoft’s Uplay.

Source: Ubiblog