One of these days…

One of these days I will master Sebenco Climb, and then I’ll be the one laughing – me! Coming back to Wipeout HD after a few years reminded me of how that damn track is the bane of my existence. So many little bumps and ridges that can send your ship into the air and make your craft’s edges smack the ground and slow you down.

Game info

But I digress. If it isn’t obvious, I’ve gotten my hands on the Wipeout Omega Collection, which is a compilation of three games I own (or have owned) on other systems. First up is Wipeout HD, which was released on the PS3 back in 2008. I played the heck out of it – not so much online because I didn’t have an uncapped connection back then, but I hammered away at the single-player content. The next is Wipeout HD Fury, the expansion to Wipeout HD that was released in 2009. It used mostly the same content as the base game, but focused a bit more on the combat side of things. I didn’t like that too much at the time, although I wonder why, because I’m enjoying it now (I also finally figured out how the damn Zone Battle mode works!). The last item in the package is Wipeout 2048, the PS Vita Wipeout game from 2012, which I owned for a short time – but lost it when my car with stolen with my PSV in it. So I don’t remember too much about that one.

Why did we get a remaster of these three games instead of a new Wipeout game made especially for the PS4? It probably has something to do with Studio Liverpool closing down half a decade ago. Also the PS3 and PSV games were already damn good looking and ran super-buttery-smooth, so it’s hard to see what the PS4 could add to the experience – not that I’m complaining. Having all three games in one place where I can play them again was more than enough reason for me to slash open my wallet.

So for those of you who know what you’re getting into, it’s up to you if you want to own them again. But for those of you who haven’t played them in the past, Wipeout is a series of futuristic hovercraft/anti-gravity craft racing games. In the standard race types, you can also pick up weapons and power-ups with which to do battle with your opponents – but there are pure race modes without weapons too. There are several speed classes, the slowest of which is quite manageable, but the fastest of which requires perfect memory or frickin’ clairvoyance to master. In each of the three games, there are multiple single-player leagues to clear to unlock more tracks and ships, and online modes where you can race against players from around the world.

Just like with Tekken 7, I plan to play this one online quite a lot because I finally can, and from what I’ve already played it seems to work quite well. The only downside to this collection is that, unlike the PS3 versions of HD and HD Fury, you can’t create a custom soundtrack of your own music, and I’ve never liked Wipeout‘s music. Just not my style.

85A bundle of three futuristic racing games you may have already played. They’re still brilliant, though.