Gran Turismo Sport is the fifteenth game under the decades-old franchise. Fifteen. Man, this franchise is older than some people reading this! The series has taken an unexpected turn with Sport, focusing on the online racing modes that pit you against other players in the world, and turning the franchise into a lean machine that is even better focused and set up for esports competitions. Polyphony Digital this week finally announced the game’s 17 October 2017 launch date and detailed what the pre-order incentives will be available for players who decide to jump in early.

Launching with over 150 cars in its roster, GT Sport will have plenty to keep traditional GT fans occupied, including a decent single-player campaign length, as well as a lot of options for customisation of liveries and modification options. That’s a lot less than previous GT games, but having less cars overall means that Polyphony Digital ends up spending more time on what’s there, resulting in incredible quality in the visuals and the handling.

One thing to note is that in GT Sport, cars are earned and not bought, which is achieved through reaching driving milestones and completing challenges. Gran Turismo 7 will have all the familiar license tests to get you ripping out your hair with frustration, but Sport wants to bring more players into the online multiplayer, and having no costs for getting the cars themselves is one way of making it easier to step into.

Pre-orders for GT Sport differ according to region. For North America and Canada, the Limited Edition $69.99 version of the game comes with eight starter cars in-game, $1m in in-game credits, a livery pack, 30 free avatars, a chromed racing helmet for your driver profile, and a limited steel book replacing the plastic case. The Digital Deluxe version, for $79.99, gives you twelve starter cars, $2m in game credits, and 60 avatars.

For the Europe regions, which includes EMEA (that we’re a part of), there will be four different versions of the game. Gran Turismo Sport Day 1 Edition for €44.99 (approx. R750) includes three starter cars, $500,000 in-game credits, and a dynamic PS4 theme. The Steelbook edition, which costs €79.99 (approx. R1,200) has steelbook packaging, $1.5m in-game credits, a livery pack, 60 avatars, the chrome racing helmet add-on, and one of three starter packs depending on your region.

The best pre-order package is the Collector’s Edition, which has been a staple since Gran Turismo 5. You get access to all three starter car packs available internationally, $2.5m in-game credits, the livery pack, the 60 avatars, the chrome helmet (I mean, is this really a popular thing?), the APEX racing art book, and a scale model of the Mercedes-AMD GT S. This will set players back €148, or approximately R2,200.

You can pre-order these editions locally from Takealot:

The Special Edition is the local equivalent of the North American Limited Edition, while Standard Plus is a different name for the European Day 1 Edition. Local retailer AWX also has the European versions of these pre-orders up on their website as well.

If you’re buying digital, you can also pre-order the base version game for R899 (first time I’ve ever seen a new release cheaper digitally!), or the Digital Deluxe version for R1,099. You’re going to need at least 50GB of free drive space for all of the disc-based versions, while the digital versions might be at least 65GB in size. I played GT Sport recently during its closed beta, and I’ll have some coverage on that sometime this week.