NAG Online > Games

Category: Games

gvg

Hearthstone has kept my attention longer than any other game has in years. For the first time since 1999’s Quake III Arena, the game in which I have invested the most time throughout the year is not an id Software title. Rather, I have been trapped in the nostalgic layers of this deceptively intricate card game – and I am loving it. However, there is no need to elaborate on the game’s excellent presentation, proper application of a free-to-play mechanic (I haven’t spent a cent on it in over six months), or the fact that it has been a standout game in what Chris has already described as a rather dull year for gaming. This we already knew. What we don’t know is how the game’s recent card expansion Goblins vs Gnomes will change things. Hit the jump for my take on what the expansion has introduced.

Read more ...

The-Evil-Within-image-3

Editor’s note: I feel compelled to mention that, while Matthew clearly didn’t have a big ol’ blast with The Evil Within, it’s a hugely divisive game and your opinion of it obviously may not match his. Check out the December issue of NAG magazine for an alternative critical perspective on the game.

Believe me when I say I take no pleasure in this. I was looking forward to this game like you don’t even know. I wanted to like it. I really did. I forked over 800 bucks for it on launch day, after all – not something one does without expecting something good in return.

Well, that’s my opinion on The Evil Within given away right at the start, isn’t it? I’m ashamed to admit I bought into the hype. A survival horror game by Shinji Mikami? Sign me up! And, for a change, I actually did read and watch a fair bit about this game before I bought it, and I still didn’t see the warning signs.

Read more ...

da_inquisition_screenshot_10

I’ve been playing Dragon Age: Inquisition for a few days now and I have a confession to make. I’m stuck.

I can’t get past Haven.

Because I keep restarting the game to design a new character.

First I wanted to make my traditional favourite Dragon Age character: an Elf rogue. As much as I tried and tried and tried to make her look like a little Celtic warrior maiden, she’d just come out looking… wrong. Oversized lips, weird cheekbones and jawlines, and tattoo colours that felt like a good idea in theory and never seemed to turn out to be a good idea in practice. So I decided to try out the new playable race, the Qunari.

Read more ...

homecoded_2014_header

Rage 2014 has long since come and gone, but for the writers at NAG we’re still sifting through all of the great items seen at the show. One of the best was the home_coded stand, dedicated to the works of local game development talent, and what a mix of titles there was on offer! Point-and-click adventures, music/rhythm, espionage, alien lobotomies – it ran the gamut. It was a vibrant gaming menagerie, and the developers are every bit as interesting as their games.

We’ll be publishing a series of articles focusing on some of these local devs and their upcoming games; if you’re joining us late and want to catch up on the entire series, simply click the following link: home_coded 2014.

Agent Unseen may have snuck its way quietly onto the home_coded stand, but certainly didn’t go unnoticed. A top-down stealth-driven roguelike-like, in Agent Unseen players attempt to achieve such lofty goals as hacking the mainframe, assassinating the traitorous guard and filing their taxes. Currently quite abstract in its presentation, it nevertheless proves to be a difficult and ever-changing challenge thanks to the various pickups you can find that carry over from map to map — items such as padded shoes, cloaking and smoke bombs change the dynamic constantly.

Read more ...

warlords-of-draenor-1920x1200

It’s here! Warlords of Draenor is here!

I’ve been playing World of Warcraft on and off since Cataclysm (earlier if you count the characters I managed to level all the way to 60 on my friend’s account), but not so much over the last year and a half. This is partly due to a lack of time – a new job and a boyfriend who doesn’t play WoW (previously I was working from home and either single or dating a dedicated raider) left me with much less WoW time than I had become accustomed to – and partly because most of the friends I had been playing the game with stopped. It’s also partly because I just lost interest.

Of course, with a new expansion it’s almost impossible to not be interested, and in October I became one of WoW‘s 600,000 new subscribers flooding the servers in anticipation for new content that promises to deliver some of the most fun we’ve had in years.

Read more ...

homecoded_2014_header

Rage 2014 has long since come and gone, but for the writers at NAG we’re still sifting through all of the great items seen at the show. One of the best was the home_coded stand, dedicated to the works of local game development talent, and what a mix of titles there was on offer! Point-and-click adventures, music/rhythm, espionage, alien lobotomies – it ran the gamut. It was a vibrant gaming menagerie, and the developers are every bit as interesting as their games.

We’ll be publishing a series of articles focusing on some of these local devs and their upcoming games; if you’re joining us late and want to catch up on the entire series, simply click the following link: home_coded 2014.

At its core, Alien Lobotomy is about maths. Placing you in the role of an alien taking the subtle approach to world domination, players infiltrate the minds of persons of power, rewiring neurons in order to take control. The objective is simple – each neuron has a value, and connecting the various neurons results in their values being added together. Once you’ve made all your connections, the total needs to fall into a certain range defined for each stage. Simple, right?

Read more ...

homecoded_2014_header

Rage 2014 has long since come and gone, but for the writers at NAG we’re still sifting through all of the great items seen at the show. One of the best was the home_coded stand, dedicated to the works of local game development talent, and what a mix of titles there was on offer! Point-and-click adventures, music/rhythm, espionage, alien lobotomies – it ran the gamut. It was a vibrant gaming menagerie, and the developers are every bit as interesting as their games.

We’ll be publishing a series of articles focusing on some of these local devs and their upcoming games; if you’re joining us late and want to catch up on the entire series, simply click the following link: home_coded 2014.

“I had quit my then job, out of sheer frustration, two years ago,” says Steven Tu, head of Twoplus Games, when I asked how he got into game development. “I took a break, because I had no idea what to do. And I attended A MAZE, where I just happened to attend a Make Games SA constitution meeting. There was this association, and all these people, and this event where people were showing games — so I just joined. I became the go-to graphic design guy, I helped design their logo, but that’s all peanuts. Because through knowing the association and people, I learnt tons about game development. Game Maker, rapid prototyping, learning about the real value of ideas.”

Read more ...

cod_advanced_warfare_review_screenshot_1

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is newcomer Sledgehammer Game’s first stab at arguably the industry’s biggest IP. While the development team did help Infinity Ward develop 2011’s Modern Warfare 3, Advanced Warfare is the first Call of Duty that Sledgehammer can call their own.

They’ve done a stellar job in injecting new life into the annualised series. What’s even more admirable is that they’ve made it their own, adding fundamental changes to tried and tested CoD formulae resulting in one of the more memorable Call of Duty titles since 2007’s original Modern Warfare.

While Sledgehammer has indeed set the bar high for 2015’s version, Advanced Warfare is not without some oddities and irritations, especially on the PC version we used for this review.

Read more ...

After Robot 1

When we think of “local games development”, board games might not immediately come to mind. However, a number of talented designers are creating projects that are imaginative and have great potential. In After Robot’s case, it’s something that is truly South African. The November issue of NAG gave some specifics of the game, but hit the jump to read my tasty impressions of the game.

Read more ...

Excuses, excuses, excuses…

We’ve all used them, we all know them and we all a palette of them for any situation. So what’s the best excuse to give for not playing a video-game? I gave this some thought while failing my recent Podcast challenge, so hit the jump for my tale of procrastination and distractions.

Sonic: After the Sequel

Read more ...


Advertisement

Login / Search

Latest games

Latest opinions

Advertisement

Advertisement