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Thread: They say you're never to old to learn ...

  1. #21

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    I started on a Nylon, playing the basic chords. Once you are comfortable with moving your hand between these basic cords then you can move onto getting to know your fret board. I moved to a 12-string Yamaha which gives a fantastic full sound, but all those steel strings are hard on you fingertips. I also spend some time on Rocksmith with my PRS electric.

    Like Cleric mentioned, tuning your guitar is very important. There are many tuners, most amps have tuners but at some stage you want to be able tune it by ear.
    It is important to know the six strings, which is E, A, D and so on.
    You could start to memorize where C is on each string for instance, up to the 12th fret. From the 12th fret; where the two dot inlays are; is just a repeat of fret 1, just in a higher octave.

    You can also practice basic pentatonic scales, which will help you moving your hand and fingers between different strings, and it sounds cool :p
    Here is a vid that will get you started-


    I personally make use of Andrew Wasson's channel on youtube.
    You can start on his website -
    Creative Guitar Studio

    I also use GuitarPro. It is a fantastic program, although I find it limiting sitting with my guitar in front of my PC.

  2. #22

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Quick question ...



    I've started practicing my chords and I have found that my left hand has a will of its own. Take chord A for instance. According to the diagram you place fingers 1-3 on strings 4-2, on the second fret (unless I'm mistaken).

    Now that's how I practice it, but my fingers 2&3 likes to fall away and then finger 1 wants to take over and play all three strings. I think it's guitar hero's fault.

    So I take it that that's bad practice and will only hinder me in the long run? Justin keeps hammering on using only the finger tips.

  3. #23
    Winner of the Chippit Badge for Being The Awesome New Guy Grimnebulin's Avatar
    Gamertag: tenmilesza Steam ID: 76561198026853999

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Playing A using your index finger as a barre (holding multiple notes with one finger) is actually pretty common among many guitarists. It can be fiddly to get all your fingers bunched up together like that, but I'd certainly encourage you to use the correct fingering for the moment. Your fingers need to learn how to work together, and whilst at a later stage you may well use only your index finger, rather keep at it until you get it right. Also, the more you workout your fingertips, the better.

  4. #24

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Usually something like this happens due to the fact that you're probably trying to squeeze the living **** out of the strings, and after spending some time trying to finger a chord correctly (try and see past the dirty implication, I know I struggle to...) your hand starts to tense up and your fingers become almost immobile.

    Take a breather, relax, and get back to it. Once you start cramping up or stiffening up, let go of the guitar and just shake your hands out for a bit to let the tension unwind.

    Everyone has something they struggle with in the beginning, primarily the F chord and using your pinky. I'm speaking from experience, as my little guy sometimes goes full retard and does the extend->contract->extend->contract->cramp thing. It'll take a while, just stick with it.

    Which guitar did you end up buying?

  5. #25

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Thanks guys, I'll keep at it.

    Oh, I ended up with a Fender Squier Bullet Strat. \o/

  6. #26

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Heeeeeey, good for you! My first guitar was an off-white (I used to call it a Hendrix replica ke-ke-ke) Fender Bullet Squire. Really cool guitars, very easy to play and if you stick with the blues or country rock it can deliver some really nice glassy tones.

    Amp?

  7. #27

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    No clue to be honest. I did check, but it has completely eluded me now.

  8. #28

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Squier Bullet is a great starting electric.

    Grim speaks the truth about getting your chords right. And above that, you need to be fretting (far better word than fimgering) chords such that if you strum all 6 strings will ring. Using just your index may dull the bottom E, so you're not getting the full chord sound.

  9. #29

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Gammaray View Post
    Thanks guys, I'll keep at it.

    Oh, I ended up with a Fender Squier Bullet Strat. \o/
    @Gammaray: Did you get a case with it? If not, I have a spare Washburn hardshell lying around.

  10. #30

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    What's your price?
    I got a guitar bag with it, but I won't say no to a hardshell.

    Alas, practice has stalled for the past week. Babba has a third tooth coming, and it seems that goes hand in hand with ear infection. So she was a bit demanding. I feel so guilty looking at the guitar every night and then not playing it. :\

  11. #31

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Free to a good home. But I for some reason recall that you're in CT, making that a bit difficult.

  12. #32

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Yeah if CT means CenTurion :P

  13. #33

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    The Top Ten Ways To Improve Your Guitar Playing.

    There is a lot of truth to what is written in the article. One of my big obstacles, apart from time, is that I'm not always sure what to practice or how to approach practice. I mean it's one thing to practice a new song until you know it but what do you learn from it? Should I rather stick to scale practice, and as he points out,
    Learn all of the inversions of every chord everywhere
    . How should something like that be approached? Would it be better to have a practice schedule where you dedicate time to scales for a week and then switch to chord inversions for the next week? There is no doubt that guitar practice is a complex beast, especially if you have to make it fit within time constraints. That is mainly why when I want to practice, I want it to be meaningful and not just a dabble with no goal.

    Anyone else been jamming or mastering something specific?

  14. #34

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    Some inspiration-


  15. #35

    Default Re: They say you're never to old to learn ...

    These are really good. A bit advanced except the first tip I'd say one should start with as soon as possible. Also relatively good for training your ear.

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