If you’ve been looking out for a nice SSD to upgrade your laptop to, you may have stumbled on Corsair’s Force range. While its not from their higher-end GT lineup, the Force 3 is notably faster than the Accelerator and Nova series. Featuring Sandforce’s SF-2281 controller, real-world performance is close to the speeds labeled on the box, with incompressible speeds falling just behind the GT series thanks to asynchronous NAND memory in the Force 3. At 7mm, it also fits in the chassis of most Ultrabooks. 

If you were looking at one, Corsair now ships SSD upgrade kits for notebooks and desktops and makes the purchase worth the consideration over competing brands such as OCZ with its booming Indilinx-powered vertex 4. The kit ships with a USB-to-SATA connector as well as a copy of some software to transfer over your OS and user files. If you’ve never seen why SSDs are more beneficial, go check out some booting videos on Youtube. SSDs allow you to breathe life into older notebooks and desktop computers, extending their useful life beyond what would be normally possible. 

While there is free software like Acronis True Image to do this for you if you’ve got a Western Digital drive, most users have no idea what’s in their laptops (not counting NAG hardware readers, who no doubt always open something up to see how it works!). For the rest, Macrium Reflect is a better choice and is free and full-featured. If convenience and ease-of-use matter to you, Corsair’s bundle might work out better anyway.

The bundle now allows Corsair to compete with Kingston’s upgrade kit that they ship will all their SSDNow! drives. Corsair’s lineup now includes the Nova, Accelerator, Force 3, Force GT and the Performance Pro. While the Nova and Accelerator are targeted at Z68/Z77 users who’d like a cache drive, they’re unlikely to have upgrade kits of their own even if they would be suited to use as boot drives in netbooks and low-cost ITX PCs.

Source: TechpowerUp!

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