The LG 27UD68-W is packed full of 4K goodness, and it’s easily one of the best 4K monitors in its price range. That’s quite a bold statement to make, but the UD68 is worthy of such praise. Here’s why.

Technical specifications
Price and supplier information

This monitor looks like it belongs in the modern workplace or gaming environment. It comes sporting an ultra-thin black bezel with a silver base/stand, and the back is finished in a glossy white or black, depending on the model you choose. It’s highly attractive, enough so to stand out in any instance. There are two model variations: one with a black back panel (27UD68-P), the other sporting a white back panel (27UD68-W). We were given the 27UD68-W for the purposes of our testing.

What looks like a premium, brushed aluminium stand is actually a coated plastic, and therefore isn’t as solid and sturdy as similarly priced options. It also offers no adjustment for height or swivel, which is a major drawback during the initial setup and the overall use of the monitor. Thankfully, the UD68 is VESA mountable, and the stand is easily detached. For UI control, it sports a simple-to-use joystick located below the centre of the panel, and it’s one of the easiest on-screen menu controls I’ve used recently, which is definitely a positive.

The overall picture quality is simply stunning. It’s able to support a screen resolution of 3840×2160, providing the user with a significant amount of screen real estate. It makes tasks such as photo and video editing an absolute pleasure. It’s also an IPS panel, which means it boasts impressively improved viewing angles over similar TN panel types.

The UD68 claims to be built on the latest 10-bit panel, but this isn’t a true 10-bit panel. Instead, it’s an 8-bit + A-FRC. Generally, if you talk about an 8-bit versus a 10-bit panel, this would relate to each colour value (RGB, or red, green and blue). Conventional monitors come with an 8-bit panel, which means on a generic black-and-white image you’d have 256 different levels of grey with which to produce the image. Moving to a 10-bit panel would mean you’d have 1,024 different levels of grey to produce the image. This is demonstrated in the image below:

As mentioned before, the LG 27UD68 isn’t a true 10-bit panel. The 8-bit + A-FRC designation basically means that the UD68’s 8-bit panel flickers rapidly between two colour shades to give you the impression of a 10-bit panel. It isn’t as good as a true 10-bit panel, obviously, but it’s generally very close, and it’s actually almost impossible to spot the difference. As a result, in terms of colour reproduction, the UD68 is phenomenal.

The monitor comes with a few useful add-ons, one of which is the split-screen function, which lets you choose up to 14 split-screen configurations and allows you to maximize your use of the increased screen real estate.

There are a few drawbacks with regards to the monitor’s overall performance, one of which is the slight backlight bleed across all the edges of the monitor. It’s less noticeable on lighter images, but it’s fairly pronounced on darker images. The screen features a 5ms response time, which isn’t ideal for gaming. Gaming on the screen for extended periods of time with the 5ms/60Hz combo meant that my eyes became easily fatigued, especially compared to my usual 1440p/144Hz setup.

If you’re reading this and wondering, “Well, should I buy one?” – the answer is a definite yes. The UD68 offers great value for money, and the combination of 27-inch, 4K-capable display with the 10-bit IPS panel means you get great colour reproduction coupled with an insane amount of desktop real estate. This screen is a must-have for content creators, engineers, and graphic designers.

8The LG 27UD68 represents fantastic value for money. I strongly recommend it to anyone who requires a large amount of desktop real estate, or incredibly accurate colour production.

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