Battlefield V promises to be one of the biggest changes to the series in recent years, but what isn’t changing is DICE’s promise to make their games playable on a wide range of systems. While Battlefield V is several months away, you can start preparing yourself for a new build to run the game just as DICE intended on day one. Rather surprising is a regression in API support, dropping DirectX 12 support in favour of DirectX 11. Battlefield 1 picked up DirectX 12 as a pet project, but it looks like DICE didn’t want to tangle with it this time around.

If you’re still unaware about the existence of a new Battlefield, you should check out the reveal trailer here, and see our funny bru Trevor Noah MCing the reveal event. Yeah, I know, it’s awesome. BFV focuses on party-based mechanics and gameplay, where team support and synergy are crucial to winning a match or fulfilling an objective. Resources are scarce, so you have to work together with your teammates. In a surprising turn of events, character customisations are bought with currency that can also be earned in-game, and DICE has promised that there will be no loot boxes of any kind. All maps and modes will be free. All DLC expansions will be free.

System requirements:

  • Operating System: Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8.1 Update, Windows 10 1511 or later 64-bit
  • CPU: AMD FX-6350 or Intel Core i5-6600K, or better
  • GPU: AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 2GB, or better
  • RAM: 8GB system memory
  • DirectX: DirectX 11 required, DirectX 11-compliant audio card required
  • Multiplayer: Internet connection with 512kbps speed, or faster
  • HDD: 50GB free disk space (base install)

In past Battlefield titles, the recommended requirements listed on Origin were typically what was required to achieve a stable framerate of 30fps with the High details preset at 1080p in the main campaign. This seems to match up with the requirements for Battlefield 1, which does make sense because the two games share the same engine, the latest version of Frostbite 3.

As time goes by, we’ll see DICE add their recommended system requirements, which will probably guarantee that players can hit above 60fps at 1080p with high or maximum quality settings. If you’re on Linux, you might have to wait a while for the DXVK project to get to running Battlefield V, but check out this video to see how much progress has been made in the last two years on Battlefield 4!

Battlefield V launches on 19 October 2018 for Windows PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One platforms. You can pre-order the game through Origin here.

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