Halo. Destiny. What’s next from Bungie? Does it matter? I don’t know if it matters, but it is Matter. At least, it might be, if a recent trademark registration made by the developer is anything to go by.

The trademark filing was made by Bungie Inc. with the European Union Intellectual Property Office with class classifications 9 and 41. Here’s what that means:

9 Computer game software downloadable from a global computer network; video game software; downloadable video games via the internet and wireless devices; electronic game software for mobile and cellular telephones; electronic game software for handheld electronic devices; electronic game software for wireless devices; game software; interactive game programs; interactive video game programs.

41 Entertainment services, namely, providing video games and video game competitions via the Internet; electronic games services provided by means of the Internet or other communication network; electronic games services provided by means of the Internet; entertainment services, namely, providing online electronic games; organization of games and video game competitions; providing on-line entertainment in the nature of electronic game tournaments; provision of on-line information in the field of computer games entertainment; entertainment services, namely, non-downloadable video game software that allows users to create, modify, upload, download, share, preview, and publish user created interactive video game content, music, and other media files via a global computer network.

That all leaves quite a lot of room for interpretation – Matter could be anything from an iPhone endless runner to a monstrous triple-A blockbuster – but it’s quite a safe bet that it will be the latter, based on Bungie’s track record. The developer should have a bit of cash lying around to make something special, what with Chinese firm NetEase making an investment in the Destiny creator with the aim of supporting “the incubation of new creative gameplay and accelerate Bungie’s vision of becoming a global, multi-franchise entertainment company” earlier this year.

The only other thing we can take from the filing is a logo for the game, the look of which tells me it’s some kind of colour run simulator where people gleefully throw handfuls of coloured powder at you while you trundle along a crowded pavement. But it probably isn’t.

Via ResetEra

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